Hill to Obama: Don't repeal DADT policy

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Hill to Obama: Don't repeal DADT policy

In a letter to President Obama, American Legion National Commander Clarence Hill stated his group's opposition to repealing the military's ‘don't ask, don't tell' (DADT) policy.

"We feel strongly that the current policy has served the U.S. military well for 17 years and it would not be wise to make a major cultural change in the middle of two wars and with tension rising on the Korean peninsula," Hill wrote. "Moreover, the Department of Defense has already directed a study on the policy and it would be premature to act before the commission conducting the study releases its findings. It defies logic."

The American Legion is concerned with reports that members of Congress might seek to repeal the law.

"House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton, who sat on the committee when DADT was implemented, opposes its repeal. Additionally, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Conway and Army Chief of Staff George Casey have also voiced concerns about the impact such a chance would have on the current force structure," said Hill, a retired U.S. Navy captain and veteran of the Gulf War. "The military is a unique environment, in which DADT has worked well without diminishing our nation's war-fighting capability. Indeed, the core purpose of our military is to fight and win our nation's wars. We believe that repealing the DADT policy at this time may well be detrimental to the security of our nation. Therefore, we urge you to postpone any such decision until the wisdom of this action has been fully studied."

Following is the text of the letter.

The Honorable President Barack ObamaThe White House1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NWWashington, DC 20500Dear Mr. President, The American Legion is concerned about reports that you might seek an amendment in Congress which would end the military's "don't ask, don't tell" (DADT) policy. As the nation's largest wartime veterans organization, we feel strongly that the current policy has served the U.S. military well for 17 years and it would not be wise to make a major cultural change in the middle of two wars and with tension rising on the Korean peninsula. Moreover, the Department of Defense has already directed a study on the policy and it would be premature to act before the commission conducting the study releases its findings. It defies logic. House Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton, who sat on the committee when DADT was implemented, opposes its repeal. Additionally, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Conway and Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey have also voiced concerns about the impact such a change would have on the current force structure. The military is a unique environment, in which DADT has worked well without diminishing our nation's war-fighting capability. Indeed, the core purpose of our military is to fight and win our nation's wars. We believe that repealing the DADT policy at this time may well be detrimental to the security of our nation. Therefore, we urge you to postpone any such decision until the wisdom of this action has been fully studied. Sincerely, Clarence E. Hill National CommanderThe American LegionCC: U.S. Congress Secretary of Defense Robert Gates Joint Chiefs of Staff

 

 

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84thEngineers

May 27, 2010 - 7:02pm

My Drill Instructor 24 years of honorably service, two tours in Iraq, Distinguished Service Medals, and guess what ambitious started a J.R.O.T.C. program at a Sarasota Florida High school. He ALSO had sexual relations with 7 identifiable JUNIOR cadets under the same motive in which he did me. Is that Justice Sir? I lost my military family as well as my biological family as a result of this. I was not a homosexual at the time these occurances happened but I am now and I am proud at the response I have received from my fellow veteran's for standing up and doing the right thing in bringing these men to Justice, I am proud they are forcing a vote before the implementation study is complete and I shall continue to be an advocate and lobbyist until this ridiculous is gone. And it just passed the Senate. HOOORAHHH

84thEngineers

May 27, 2010 - 6:57pm

many on the Senate Armed Services Committee, I was raped at the age of 17 by my Drill SSG at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri it's due to policies like Don't Ask Don't Tell, that made me scared to come forward and report this to my Company Commander. In each of my meetings I have been proud to wear my Legion Lapel Pin even during my Congressional Testimony. It disheartens me to see an official statement by you to President Obama stating the policy works as is. It clearly does not. I love this country more than life itself and would sacrifice myself as many of our brethren have done over many years of service to this great nation. The individual I mentioned above I did report, the military's method of process? To move me to another base while moving for an Administrative Separation. I DID NOTHING WRONG, I asserted myself to my commander and advised him of my families strong relationship with Senator Arlen Specter, they suddenly changed their tune and Discharged me honorably.

Steve Finney

May 26, 2010 - 1:59pm

Seriously, why are we really even worried about this... repeal it and move on with the mission. Disappointing the AL took a position like this... We have bigger fish to fry.

brad moss

May 26, 2010 - 11:59am

WOULD LIKE TO SEE THE COMMANDER GO ON TV TO STATE THAT WE OPPOSE THIS, IT NEEDS TO GET OUT TO MORE PEOPLE SO THEY WELL JOIN IN TO STOP THIS NEW THINKING FOR THE MILITARY. HONOR AND COURAGE BRAD MOSS

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