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Intersection savvy

Practicing good intersection awareness is one part of riding that can’t be put-a-side for another day. From day one you when you take that initial cruise by yourself on that shiny new scooter, to the older rider just able to get the kick-stand up, we all need to have and use intersection savvy. Among the statistics are the reasons we need to be cool and use our head and eyes to constantly scan:

1. Almost half of accidents occurred at intersections.

2. The most common type of two-vehicle crash is when the front of the motorcycle strikes the side of the passenger vehicle – i.e. a left-turning driver violating the riders Right-of-Way and the motorcyclist smashing into the passenger’s door in an intersection.

Tip 1. When approaching an intersection in heavy traffic be ready to swerve or brake; remember that brake and swerve maneuver you did in the parking lot at riders class. Now you know why.

Tip 2. Cover your front brake lever to shorten your reaction time in a questionable intersection. That impact might not happen if you can get the brakes working early.

Tip 3. At a stoplight stay in first gear, check your mirrors frequently, and be ready to move out if that car approaching from behind doesn’t appear to be stopping. Use the cages around you to evade a rear impact at a stop by going between them or around them, use this as a last resort and only in case of doom.

Hammer

ALR Road Captain, Post 1 Omaha, Neb.

Read more in Rider Safety Corner

 

ellisk

August 14, 2013 - 4:00pm

The one thing I hear a lot of is the guy was looking right at me and still pulled out in front of me. Bad mistake because you think he saw you your all set. What I learned along time ago is watch there front tire you will notice it moving before anything else.

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