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Vote for America's most beloved veterans

Vote for America's most beloved veterans

From every generation of Americans that has gone to war, the names of a few veterans are added to our nation’s collective memory – some for selflessness and courage under fire, some for national leadership in tough times, some for their celebrity.

During the month of May, The American Legion – the nation’s largest wartime veterans organization, numbering 2.4 million – invites all Americans to pick who they believe to be the country’s most beloved veterans, choosing from 100 names online at www.legion.org/belovedveterans. Individuals can cast up to 25 votes, and if you don’t see your favorites on the list, submit a name or two.

Veterans receiving the most votes will be featured in the November issue of The American Legion Magazine and online.

While every man and woman who has worn a uniform deserves the thanks of a grateful nation, having put country above themselves, a select few enter the history books or become household names because of their achievements on or off the battlefield. By giving Americans an opportunity to learn about, remember and celebrate our most famous veterans, The American Legion hopes to bring attention to the honorable nature of military service, teach some history and, perhaps, refresh our memories.

The Legion’s list includes veterans from nearly every war era, including:

  • Quentin Roosevelt. The youngest son of former President Theodore Roosevelt was shot down during World War I – and buried by the Germans with full military honors.
  • Doris "Dorie" Miller. For carrying fellow sailors to safety and manning an anti-aircraft machine gun at Pearl Harbor, Miller was the first black American to receive the Navy Cross.
  • Jeremiah Denton. The future senator from Alabama confirmed that Americans were being tortured in North Vietnam, blinking his eyes in Morse code during a TV interview.
  • Chris Kyle. Called the most lethal sniper in U.S. military history, the Navy SEAL served four tours in Iraq and was awarded two Silver Stars and five Bronze Stars for valor.

Cast your votes today at www.legion.org/belovedveterans.

More in Honor & Remembrance

 

Pat Halton

May 13, 2014 - 9:18am

ALL veterans should be "America's Most Beloved." None who serve selflessly seek any such personal honor, distinction and recognition -- only hoping to make a difference for our freedom, security and way of life. Having any such "Most Beloved" category/vote is like asking a parent to rank their children from most loved to least loved -- they just can't do it and attempting it would be inappropriate. My vote would be for a generic veteran without a name, representing all who faithfully served. Doing otherwise -- elevating a few above the many -- does a disservice to all, is divisive and just contrary to the values shared throughout the brotherhood in uniform, past and present.

cowboyup

May 1, 2014 - 12:07pm

All 40 plus others which I know were affected including myself in Tucson VA. However the 40 plus Soldiers/Veterans who suffered and died at the bloody hands of the Veterans Administration. How Sick this makes me. How dare you call yourselves an Organization of good healthcare for Veterans while we sit and become sicker either waiting for fair ratings or just an appointment. Give These 40 Plus Veterans That Honor. Their the ones who deserve it. Oh and please quit offering bonuses to Administrators. Their Killing Us By The Numbers.

harpoon

May 13, 2014 - 12:55pm

I'm sure thousands of people die annually after making appointments with any medical organization. That doesn't make it the fault of the organization making the appointment. The question is did these people die of what caused them to make an appointment in the first place. There's no excuse for keeping two sets of waiting list ratings, but people die even after coming from appointments. My experience is the VA offers great healthcare to veterans, but then I have had experience with them. I don't just weep and wail after reading the newspaper.

Tom Caldwell

April 30, 2014 - 7:59am

For me there are just to many HEROS those on this list and the others that gave all, served and are still serving and fighting for this nation, There is no honorable mention list for me they are all Heros and my thanks to all and their families,may GOD bless them and GOD bless America.

Pat Halton

May 13, 2014 - 9:23am

I'm with you Tom. I suggest the Legion terminate this "Most Beloved Veteran" survey ASAP. ALL veterans should be "America's Most Beloved." None who serve selflessly seek any such personal honor, distinction and recognition -- only hoping to make a difference for our freedom, security and way of life. Having any such "Most Beloved" category/vote is like asking a parent to rank their children from most loved to least loved -- they just can't do it and attempting it would be inappropriate. My vote would be for a generic veteran without a name, representing all who faithfully served. Doing otherwise -- elevating a few above the many -- does a disservice to all, is divisive and just contrary to the values shared throughout the brotherhood in uniform, past and present.

harpoon

May 13, 2014 - 1:05pm

I agree with you Pat. I also think there are more than a few on the list who were famous, but also veterans. Some were not in the formal armed forces. Theodore Roosevelt was with a force he raised as a volunteer group for the duration of the war with Spain. This is a list of beloved, but also veterans mixed with really deserving hero vets. So I think you're right Pat, ALL veterans should be "America's Most Beloved." I think Benedict Arnold should be on the list if only for his personal sacrifices and military acts, but no he was driven to commit treason, by a congress which gave credit to others for his deeds, failed to pay him back for his funds he used to supply and pay his men and passing him over for promotion while promoting less deserving men. But that's me.

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