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Should military restrictions against women in combat be lifted?

 

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vetcounselor

March 24, 2011 - 12:53pm

Why are women and minority Vets still discriminated against in some American Legion Posts?

Charles Carter

March 24, 2011 - 5:10pm

As a combat veteran, I realize all to well the hardships faced by our youg people serving in the military. It is a special person that volunteers for this type of service and gender should not play a role in the selectiion of candidates.
Long ago, in WW II, it was felt that segregation was ok in the military until the Buffalo Soldiers and Muskagee Airmen proved that theory wrong. Although I have not served with women in my day (Vietnam era) I have served with minorities and am proud to say it was a rewarding experience and I feel this would have been too. There are far more important issues facing this country today and we should not burden ourselves with things like this. We should honor all who served regardless of race or gender.

Honey Badger

March 24, 2011 - 6:06pm

all of the above.

richie11

March 24, 2011 - 7:32pm

As a retiree with 22 years who served in the Ordnance Corps,I have to say that there were a lot of women that worked for me that I wouldn't have a second thought about them serving next to me in a combat situation. However,in the USA the women are mostly not brought up with the fit to survive/fight mentality like in other countries,ie;Korea,China and Israel just to name a few.I will say that we have come a long way since the days that I served.

1Namvet71

March 25, 2011 - 12:21am

It is ok to have women in combat roles generally. As mentioned, Israel has done it for years. The problem lies in the American attitude that women need to be protected by a male. Women themselves, taking note of the Ms. generation, have perpetuated this by tacitly agreeing.
When men and women serve together sex is going to happen, whether falling in love, or casual shack-ups. It is going to happen. Add in a few testosterone fueled male egos and you have a receipt for disaster. I served for 12 years and saw this first hand as both an NCO and as an officer.
I worked with and for many competent women and only met one who I would not want to have in the foxhole next to me. The person I would not want in the foxhole near me is the jerk who feels that he has to rush out and 'save' the hapless female in distress, as I would probably end up getting killed trying to save him.
A gradual integration is needed until our society as a whole is ready to change its attitude.

Bob95490

March 25, 2011 - 7:13pm

If the exact same physical fitness and training standards are used for women, as men, and a woman wishes to serve in combat infantry, combat engineers or as a tanker I don't see why they shouldn't serve. They are already bringing the smoke in the air and serving as combat support troops.

Robert Ireland - Post 174 (PUFL)

Flight Doc

March 25, 2011 - 7:52pm

I am a female on active duty. I have no problem with being told that I can't be slotted in a certain job if I am incapable of meeting the physical requirements actually needed to perform the job, but twice in my military career, I have been denied positions that I was 100% capable of performing (Infantry BN Surgeon and BDE Surgeon) simply because of my gender. Neither of those positions requires extreme physical capabilities and I am above average in fitness, usually scoring around 280 on the male scale on the APFT. I was able to observe the tasks performed by the males who were awarded those jobs and have no doubt that I would have been successful. Instead, I was sent to lesser positions that didn't interest me as much.

Entire units should not be coded male only. Instead, the physical requirements of each job should be considered along with the physical capabilities of each woman (or man!) candidate. If she is capable, she should be considered for the position.

GrandNK

March 27, 2011 - 10:03am

There's no doubt that mental capabilities of our military women are equal to or above military men, so let the physical test speak for everyone. ALL PHYSICAL and MENTAL testing standards set for jobs should be the same for EVERYONE. NO CHEATING OR SPECIAL ALLOWANCES. The only thing that concerns me is that we raise American men to be protective of our women, and in really tough combat regions, this adds to the mental stress of our men. Physically weak women, or men, SHOULD NOT be put where they don't belong.

rakret

January 24, 2013 - 7:53pm

bad idear for the most part. are we changing policy because of a few? i am sure there are women that can do the job just as well as men. but at what cost?

Clifford Higgins

February 2, 2013 - 12:05pm

As a Vietnam era vet I think the whole mindset of the military will have to change. From the recruit to the top.. With my training and my mindset at the time, I'm not sure what the hell I would of done? I was a machine gunner on a CH-46. We went in the shit more than I care to share with you.Had I had a female crew member - I'm just not sure...? It was different then - it will have to be different NOW. With the proper training (from the get go) I think it can work..

Unknown

April 3, 2014 - 1:05pm

If people are saying "No. By mixing men and women in combat, the potential for distraction is too high and could be deadly." Then how come the men and women in the military right now are not getting so called "distracted"? How will giving women more rights distract the men if they arent even getting distracted right now while women are still serving for our country?

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