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American Legion Riders


Legion Riders and the Legacy Run T e American Legion Riders program has grown dramatically over the last two decades, and


is now one of the most popular and visible activities that T e American Legion conducts. T e program was fi rst conceived at Post 396 in Garden City, Mich., in 1993. T e American Legion Legacy Run, begun in 2006, now generates over $500,000 each August, and hundreds of other events raise funds to help Legion-friendly causes nationwide. Today, Legion Riders is a fully sanctioned program of the Internal Affairs Commission. Each


chapter manages its programs at the post level. Chapters oſt en participate in Rolling T under (a POW/MIA rally held every Memorial Day weekend in Washington); at end regional rides across the country; raise money for veterans, wounded warriors and other needs in their local communities; escort military units to airports before they deploy and welcome them home when they return; and form honor guards to shield military funerals from outsiders. A major highlight of the Riders’ year is the Legacy Run. Riders and other motorcycling


veterans leave Indianapolis and rumble to the national convention. Each year breaks another record for the amount of money raised by the Run in support of T e American Legion Legacy Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships to children of U.S. military personnel killed since Sept. 11, 2001.


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Another Year, Another Legacy Run Record  2006: $179,000  2007: $326,800  2008: $457,000  2009: $523,299  2010: $634,000


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Contact:  wsloan@legion.org (Legacy Run)  smiller@legion.org (Legion Riders)  acy@legion.org (Legacy Scholarship)


Links


www.legion.org/riderswww.legion.org/riders/scholarship


20 T e American Legion Annual Report | 2011


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