This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
American Legion Riders


Division


ivision


American Legion Riders Since its founding at Post 396 in Garden City, Mich., in 1993, the American Legion Riders


program has grown into one of the organization’s most popular and visible activities. Fully sanctioned by the Internal Aff airs Commission, Legion Riders raise money and awareness for various Legion programs at special events, fundraising rides, parades and posts nationwide. Since 2006, one of the biggest causes adopted by Legion Riders has been the annual American Legion Legacy Run, which has raised more than $2.7 million for the Legion’s Legacy Scholarship Fund. T e scholarships help pay college tuition for children of U.S. military personnel killed on duty since 9/11. Each Legion Riders chapter manages its programs at the local post level. Chapters oſt en participate


in Rolling T under, a POW/MIA rally conducted every Memorial Day weekend in Washington; at end regional rides across the country; raise money for veterans, wounded warriors, and other needs in local communities; escort military units to airports when they deploy and welcome them home when they return; and form honor guards to protect the privacy of families during military funerals.


Legacy Run fundraising streak  2006: $179,000  2007: $326,800  2008: $457,000  2009: $523,299  2010: $634,000  2011: $642,666


Contacts  legionriders@legion.orgacy@legion.org (Legacy Scholarship)


Connections  www.legion.org/riders  On Facebook, search “National American Legion Riders”


2012 | T e American Legion Annual Report


23


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60