This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
American Legion Family


Division ivision


T e Legion Family Tradition T e American Legion could not accomplish its goals, nor uphold the promises contained within


its four pillars of service, without the tireless and enthusiastic cooperation of the entire American Legion family. T is includes the American Legion Auxiliary, Sons of T e American Legion and American Legion Riders. Two organizations soon took shape aſt er the Legion was founded in 1919, to help fulfi ll the nation’s


commitment to veterans and patriotic values. T e American Legion Auxiliary was created by the Legion as a patriotic women’s organization made up of female relatives of Legion-eligible veterans. Prominent Auxiliary programs include Girls State and Girls Nation, distribution of veteran-made poppies, and junior-membership activities for young women. With nearly 800,000 members, the American Legion Auxiliary is built on its mot o of help for others: “Service Not Self.” Sons of T e American Legion, created in 1932, is not a separate organization like the Auxiliary;


it is a Legion program under the supervision of the Internal Aff airs Commission. Open to male descendants of Legion-eligible veterans, many of today’s nearly 340,000 Sons spend time volunteering at VA health-care facilities, raising money for the American Legion Child Welfare Foundation and supporting the Citizens Flag Alliance. American Legion Riders, another program of the organization, is considered part of the Legion


family, too. Riders operate in chapters sponsored by posts, and may include Legionnaires, SAL members or Auxiliary members on their rosters.


Contacts  alahq@alaforveterans.orgsal@legion.orglegionriders@legion.org


Connections  www.alaforveterans.orgwww.legion.org/sonswww.legion.org/riders  Visit “National American Legion Riders” on Facebook


2012 | T e American Legion Annual Report


35


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60