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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

Family history in the military

My maternal grandfather served during World War I. My father served in the Navy during World War II. My maternal uncle served in the Marines after World War II and was discharged, then joined the Army when the Korean War started and went to Korea. He was with the 2nd Infantry Division. He was in a battle and was captured. He was listed as missing in action until the end of hostilities, when he was accounted for from a list from a captured American doctor that stated that he was treated for malnutrition and pneumonia. He died while he was still a prisoner of war.

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Family military history

-John Davidson of Prince Edward County, Va., Virginia Line, American Revolution -Dr. Richard Davidson of Kentucky, U.S. Army, Fort Adams, Miss., 1804-1807, and surgeon at the Battle of New Orleans, War of 1812 -Louis M. Davidson of Mississippi, Pvt., Mexican War -Roland J. Davidson of New Orleans, U.S. Army Air Corps, World War II and Korean War -Kerry J. Davidson, U.S. Army, Vietnam War Various other collateral family members in all branches of service, from Revolution to present-day campaigns.

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Sherman history

I served in the Air Force August 1958 to November 1963. My oldest son, in the Army for 26 years. My next son had 12 years in the Army. My third son had 55 years in the Marine Corps.

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Generations

Generations

In my family we have had five generations in the Navy. My grandfather, Canadian Navy; my father, Canadian Navy; myself, U.S. Navy, my son, U.S. Navy; and my grandson, now serving in the U.S. Navy as a medical officer.

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Fred A. Hedlund returns from the Pacific in 1945

Chief Fred A. Hedlund returned to get married on July 14, 1945, to Miss Eleanor V. Anderson of Chicago.

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At 12, future Air Force master sergeant saves brother's life

At 12, future Air Force master sergeant saves brother's life

Harris and Mable Amundson had five sons; four of the brothers served in the U.S. Air Force: Gerald, Dorvin, Roger and Dennis. The fifth son, Kenneth, signed up but was rejected for a medical reason. Jerry saved my life when I was 7 and he was only 12. My brother, Gerald C. Amundson, was only two months from completing his senior year at the high school in Benson, Minn., in 1952 when he dropped out of school to join the Air Force.

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Right next door to the Arizona

I remember when I was a kid and my mom told me that my uncle Glenn (Reddick) was assigned to a ship that just happened to be moored right next to the USS Arizona on Dec. 7, 1941. At the time, when I was 9 years old, that really didn't matter much to me. Later on in life, and unfortunately after my uncle Glenn passed away, I realized what a significant part of history he and his shipmates would play. I never really got a good chance to talk with uncle Glenn, or my Marine uncle on my dad's side of the family.

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Couple's hobby leads to proper headstone for Civil War veteran

Civilians Richard and Joni Smith are a couple that share long family ties to the military and a fascination with genealogy. This has led them to the discovery of several things in common they wouldn't otherwise know about one another: they have ancestors who fought on opposite sides of the American Revolution. Richard's ancestor, Phillipp Heimrich Stuber, was a German mercenary, fighting for the Redcoats. Joni's, John Mudgett, was an American.

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My military family

My dad's uncle served in World War I, was gassed, died in the 1920s and was a member of The American Legion. My dad served in the Army in Europe in World War II and was a member of the Legion. My dad's two brothers both served in the Air Force, one in World War II, the other in Vietnam. I served in the Army Reserve for six year during the Vietnam era and am a member of the Legion.

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A family in service

My mother was the youngest of 10 siblings - she was born in 1919, to give you an idea of the time frame. The three oldest siblings served during the Great War (World War I): Frank Hall, U.S. Army ambulance driver, Austro Italian front; George Hall, a seaman, served with Naval Aviation; and Jeanette Hall, a yeomanette. Four of the younger siblings served during World War II and after: Dr. Charles H. Hall, medical officer, U.S. Army, North Africa and Italy; Dr. Reina Hall, U.S. Army nurse, North Africa and Italy; William Hall, U.S. Army Air Corps, U.S. Army Air Forces and U.S.

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Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, Merrill's Marauders

Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, Merrill's Marauders

My dad, Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, was one of 2,997 combat veteran troops who volunteered for Merrill's Marauders. He was one of 130 who came out of the Burma jungles alive, but was not one who was not hospitalized. (Only two were not.) Dad never talked about his time spent there, except for the fact that he got malaria and dysentery and was hospitalized.

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Some serve who don't fight

My father was drafted in 1943 at 32. His civilian employment was as a certified public accountant. He was sent to air gunner's school at Greensboro, N.C. Before he was sent overseas he received orders to Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio. From there he was sent to Fort Sheridan in Chicago. For the next three years he was engaged in contract termination negotiations with Ford, GM, Chrysler and Boeing. By the start of 1944 the Army Air Forces had already contracted for more aircraft than were necessary. Three times he applied for command of an Air Sea Rescue PT Boat.

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One generation of brothers serves over 150 years in military

One generation of brothers serves over 150 years in military

For 11 of the 16 Davis children, serving in the military served as a path out of their hometown, Wetumpka, Ala., where opportunities were few and far between in the 1950s and 1960s. Between them, they can boast more than a century and a half of service. "There was nothing going on in Wetumpa," said Lebronze Davis, Vietnam veteran and Legionnaire. "You had the cotton mill, you had the logging company, sawmill, or you stayed and worked on the farm.

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Family traces military history back to World War I

My great-uncle, Isaac Jacob (I.J.) Harvey, lies at rest beneath a simple, white cross in Arlington National Cemetery. He fell on the fields of France in World War I. My father, Royce Harold Harvey, was an "Alligator Marine," having fought on the beaches of Guadalcanal, Saipan, Tinian, Tarawa and others. His older brother, Rollo S. Harvey, was also a Marine who fought in the carnage of Iwo Jima. Their younger brother, Jack G. Harvey, was a Seabee, who served during the latter part of the war.

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Our family tree is camouflaged

Our family tree is camouflaged

I do genealogy, and my daughter always jokes and says our family tree is camouflaged. It is true that we have several generations of our family that have served their country. My great-grandfather on my mother's side was a sergeant major in the British Army during World War I, my mother was in the English Women's Auxillary Territorial Service during World War II, and my father was in the U.S. Army Air Corps. They met in England and married there in 1945. I have followed in my parent's footsteps and have also served. I was in the Signal Corps in the U.S.

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All wars

My fourth-great-grandfather served as a captain of Connecticut volunteers during the French-Indian War. He participated in the Siege of Lewisboro, Nova Scotia. My third-great-grandfather served as a captain in the Connecticut militia during the Revolutionary War. He saw action along the Hudson River, from Peekskill to Fort Miller in Saratoga County, N.Y. My father served in the Marine Corps as a machine gunner in World War I and saw action in Haiti when sent there to quell the native uprisings.

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Every branch!

In the limited amount of family history I have delved into, I have found family members in every branch of military service. Great-great-great-grandfather, Continental Army Great-uncle, Navy, Spanish-American War Great-uncle, Army cavalry officer, World War I Grandfather, Merchant Marines, World War I Father, Army Air Corps, World War II and Korea Mother, Coast Guard, World War II Two uncles, Army, World War II Uncle, Marine Corps, World War II Father-in-law, China marine and Marines, World War II Myself, Navy, 1965-1971 Son, Navy Grandson, Army

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Generations that served/some who gave all

Great-uncle: Frank Branigan, World War I, U.S. Army, killed in action in France. Second cousin: Roy Hydecker, World War II, U.S. Marine Corps GSGT, D-Day invasion force, killed in action in St. Lo, France. Cousin: Bill DeSetto, Vietnam War, U.S. Air Force communications, Vietnam and Cambodia. Uncle: Frank DeSetto, U.S. Navy, Korea. Cousin: Ernest DeSetto, U.S. Navy, late 1950s. Third cousin: Frank DeSetto, Vietnam, U.S. Marine Corps, shot in the eye and survived with glass eye. Me: James E. Branigan, Vietnam, U.S. Navy 1967-1971, aviation machinist mate, VR24 Naples and USS Wasp CV18.

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Long line of Army

I had heard stories of my grandfather in World War I. My father and his brothers served in World War II; one of them did not return. My uncle on my mother's side did three tours in Vietnam. My poor father had five daughters. I joined the Army in October 1974 and got out in February 1978. Durning my enlistment I was the first and only airborne female at Fort Lewis, Wash. I was the first military female to jump into Alaska and Panama. Three of my four children joined. In 2004 my twin daughters were in Iraq. They were both diesel mechanics.

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CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels Sr.

CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels Sr.

CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels served 37 years in the regular Army. His specialty was in logistics and he was stationed with various units from field artillery to military intelligence. He attended the U.S. Army School, Europe's school of logistics, where he made such good grades that he was invited back to be an instructor. With every unit he served with subsequently, he was responsible for all the ordering of supplies, of great value in some cases.

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