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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

Years later, son unearths WWII history that father kept silent

When I was young, my dad, Dugan Swindle, named his dog "Gouvy." I asked him why that name. He told me that it was the name of a town in Belgium he was in during World War II. My dad had been in the 89th Quartermaster Railhead Company. I presumed railhead meant close to the front line - issuing rations, ammo and so on. When I was older, he said they were surrounded in this town. He wouldn't say anything more. He passed away at age 62. Later, I Googled "89th Quartermaster." Now I know what happened there but not what my dad went through personally.

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One family's gives six-star WWII service

Six of the Allen men left their home in small-town Minnesota to fight in World War II. Their father would hang a six-star banner in the window until they all returned home in 1945. Jim Allen, his grandson, said the red around the edges of the banner has faded. “But the blue stars are still as bright as ever,” he said. The banner has been passed around the family for decades, and for now it’s Jim’s. Jim served in the Army from 1961 to 1964, stateside and in Beirut, Germany. His father, Archie Allen, served in the Army from 1941 to 1945 in Naples, Italy, he said.

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My Family Tradition

My Family Tradition

This is a newspaper clipping about my father, Oliver Hackwith and his brothers. He lied about his age and joined the Army in 1930 at 17. He started in the infantry, then went to the cavalry and the to the Air Corps just before World War II started. During the war he served as a ball turret gunner on a B-17. He was awarded five air medals and the Distinguished Flying Cross. During the time of the Korean War he was assigned to a B-36 crew but never deployed. He finished his career in weather reconnaissance, on modified B-29s. I joined the Army in 1964 and served four years as a tank crewman.

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Four Womack children in Desert Storm

Four Womack children in Desert Storm

This is a story about five out of seven children who went through the military. Two of them went through ROTC in college, and another one joined the National Guard and paid for her education. Another one joined the National Guard and stayed for eight years. The older son went into West Point and got his education. One has retired at colonel, another two retired at lieutenant colonel and another daughter is still in the National Guard as a master sergeant. Four of them have a combined 130 years of Army and National Guard.

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Former sailor shares generations-long family military legacy

Former sailor shares generations-long family military legacy

Photo | John Boulette stands in uniform in 1947. John Boulette is part of the third generation in his family to serve in the United States military. He was inspired to serve, following in his father's footsteps. His father, Henry Boulette, was in the Calvary during World War I, but the war ended before he saw any action, John said. Henry returned to Massachusetts, where he was a founding member of a Legion post in the Worcester, Mass.-area.

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U.S. Army family tradition

U.S. Army family tradition

Cpl. Frederick Etz (my great uncle) served and died during World War I. 1st Lt. Edward Etz (infantry platoon leader) who just turned 93, participated at Normandy (Utah Beach) during World War II and was awarded Purple Heart. 1st Lt. Josephine Etz (nurse) participated in the Pacific (Guam) during World War II. I, Charles Etz, served during Vietnam in the Army Security Agency and retired as a sergeant first class. GO ARMY! GOD BLESS AMERICA!

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Thinking of the past generations on Memorial Day Weekend

As I set gaze upon the Stars and Stripes that flies from my home this Memorial Day Weekend, I reflect ... To not only those who have paid the ultimate cost to ensure OUR freedom whom I have known, but to a deeper sense of pride within. I speak of my family's legacy and tradition of service that dates back to the American Revolution, through every major conflict involving this great nation.

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My family

My daddy was in the Army during World War II and then called back for the Korean conflict, where he received two Purple Hearts and one with a cluster. I joined the Air Force in 1966. I started the process straight from high school, but in those days females had to be 18 and have the signature of both parents. I met my husband in the Air Force in 1967. Our son served in the Marines; in fact, he was in boot camp in California when the Desert Storm conflict started. My uncle, Daddy's brother, who is only three years older than I am, retired from the Air Force, as did his wife.

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McGraw family in U.S. military

My grandfather served in World War I, my dad in World War II, my uncle in the Marines just after Korea, myself in Germany during the Vietnam era, my brother in Vietnam, and one other brother in the Navy during the "Nam" era. I also have a nephew who is a "lifer" and a major in the U.S. Army right now. I have always heard that I had a couple of relatives who fought for the Union in the Civil War, but I have no idea who they were.

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My military family history

My family's military association has three parts. First, my mother had two brothers, both of whom saw military service during World War II. The oldest served in the U.S. Navy and survived to return home at some later time. The youngest served in the U.S. Army; he was wounded but lived to also return home after recovery from his injury. While I had heard about their military service when I was growing up, I was not motivated to join the U.S. military because of their service. Second, growing up, I had a sister and two stepbrothers. All four of us served time in the U.S. military.

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1st. Lt. Claire Garvin Cohagan

1st. Lt. Claire Garvin Cohagan

My father was in World War I in the Army. He fought in France and the Argonne Forest. He always said the toughest thing for him was watching the "younger" men get killed in the trenches and getting gassed with mustard gas. On one occasion he gave his gas mask to a noncom who didn't have one, peed on his handkerchief for a mask, got sick and laid in a wet trench for two days trying to recover. And the "best" time was relief of duty to go to Paris.

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Family military service

My great-great grandfather on my mother's side served in "D" Company, 13th Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers during the Civil War. My mother's father served in the 92 Regiment of Foot-The Gordon Highlanders during World War I, British Expeditionary Force in France. My great-grand-uncle served in the Spanish-American War in Cuba, and during World War I in the Army. I had a grand-uncle Army, and a grand-cousin Navy, during World War I. On my father's side, my grandfather is a retired Army master sergeant, brevet captain when he retired in 1946.

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A World War I veteran's legacy extends three generations

My dad, Lieutenant Colonel Raymond C. Lutz, graduated from Pitt Dental school in 1917 just in time to join the Army and serve on active duty at Camp Hancock. He stayed in the reserves and during the 1930s served as commander of the Perry L. Gaston Post in New Castle, Pa. He was called back to active duty in 1942 and served until 1945. My oldest brother, Joe served in the U.S. Navy from 1946-47. Brother Dave served in the Pennsylvania National Guard in the 1960s. Sister Phyllis married a career Army officer who served 20 years. Brother Jim served in the U.S. Air Force from 1956-1960.

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Navy Brothers

Navy Brothers

This a story about the three Hayes brothers and their service in the Navy. Bill served in the mid-to-late 1950s, including Aviation Storekeeper Class A School at Jacksonville, Fla., and on the flight deck of the USS Hornet, now moored at Alameda, Calif. Harold served from 1964-1967, including Aviation Storekeeper Class A School in Millington, Tenn., Naval Station Rota Spain, Squadron HS-3 at NAS Norfolk and the USS Randolph CVS-15, S-6 Division, and advanced to AK2. I (Howard) joined in September 1965.

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Family of sailors

My father served in the U.S. Coast Guard during Prohibition. I served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1973, reaching the rank of AE2. My youngest daughter just separated from the U.S. Navy in December 2014. She served as a U.S. Navy Corpsman. Three generations have served, perhaps more to come in the future. We are all proud of our time served!

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Oliveira military veterans

My father immigrated from Portugal as a young man. I am the youngest of three sons. My oldest brother, who has passed, was in the Army for 27 years and served with the 25th Infantry Division in Korea, where he was wounded. He retired in the 70's.My second brother, also Army, served in Vietnam with the 1st Infantry as a combat engineer.I served proudly in Vietnam in 1967 with a maintenance battalion in the central. My mother had all her three sons in the u.s. Army at one time. My father was so thankful to be here and have his own business - made sure we were also dedicated to our country.

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Three generations serving this nation

Father - William Carl Reed, 2nd Lt., U.S. Army Anti-aircraft Artillery, World War II Son - Gregory Carl Reed, Sp5, U.S. Army Combat Medic, 1967-1971 Grandson - Brandon Jared Reed, SSG, U.S. Air Force Crew Chief, currently on active duty

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240 years of service

240 years of service

My Coolidge fifth-great-grandfather was at the Boston Tea Party and died at the Battle of Lexington. Another Coolidge fought in the French and Indian War. I had Coolidge and Cammack ancestors on both sides of the Civil War. My grandfather Coolidge fought in World War I, my father in the Navy in World War II, I was on a submarine and LST during the Vietnam War, and my nephew currently is in the Army. Victor Landry Post 159 Bryan, Texas

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Family legacy

As far as I know we had no family members in the first World War, but boy, we had a few in the second World War. My father (first-born from parents from Poland) and two of his brothers ... three more uncles from my mother's side. They all came back except my Uncle Joe, who was killed in the Pacific theater (Philippines, I believe). One uncle served in the Korean War. Myself and a brother served in Vietnam ... the stories I could tell ... whew ... would fill more than a few pages. Sgt. Larry Donaleski 6922nd, 4th Detachment, 13th Air Force

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Family service to country

My grandfather served in the Army in World War I. My father served in the Navy during World War II. He received the Purple Heart for shrapnel injuries he sustained when his ship was sunk during the invasion of the Philippines. I have two brothers, one who served in the Navy during the Vietnam conflict. He was stationed on an aircraft carrier that flew missions over Vietnam. My other brother served in the Army as a translator during the Vietnam conflict.

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