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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

My military family history

My family's military association has three parts. First, my mother had two brothers, both of whom saw military service during World War II. The oldest served in the U.S. Navy and survived to return home at some later time. The youngest served in the U.S. Army; he was wounded but lived to also return home after recovery from his injury. While I had heard about their military service when I was growing up, I was not motivated to join the U.S. military because of their service. Second, growing up, I had a sister and two stepbrothers. All four of us served time in the U.S. military.

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1st. Lt. Claire Garvin Cohagan

1st. Lt. Claire Garvin Cohagan

My father was in World War I in the Army. He fought in France and the Argonne Forest. He always said the toughest thing for him was watching the "younger" men get killed in the trenches and getting gassed with mustard gas. On one occasion he gave his gas mask to a noncom who didn't have one, peed on his handkerchief for a mask, got sick and laid in a wet trench for two days trying to recover. And the "best" time was relief of duty to go to Paris.

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Family military service

My great-great grandfather on my mother's side served in "D" Company, 13th Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers during the Civil War. My mother's father served in the 92 Regiment of Foot-The Gordon Highlanders during World War I, British Expeditionary Force in France. My great-grand-uncle served in the Spanish-American War in Cuba, and during World War I in the Army. I had a grand-uncle Army, and a grand-cousin Navy, during World War I. On my father's side, my grandfather is a retired Army master sergeant, brevet captain when he retired in 1946.

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A World War I veteran's legacy extends three generations

My dad, Lieutenant Colonel Raymond C. Lutz, graduated from Pitt Dental school in 1917 just in time to join the Army and serve on active duty at Camp Hancock. He stayed in the reserves and during the 1930s served as commander of the Perry L. Gaston Post in New Castle, Pa. He was called back to active duty in 1942 and served until 1945. My oldest brother, Joe served in the U.S. Navy from 1946-47. Brother Dave served in the Pennsylvania National Guard in the 1960s. Sister Phyllis married a career Army officer who served 20 years. Brother Jim served in the U.S. Air Force from 1956-1960.

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Navy Brothers

Navy Brothers

This a story about the three Hayes brothers and their service in the Navy. Bill served in the mid-to-late 1950s, including Aviation Storekeeper Class A School at Jacksonville, Fla., and on the flight deck of the USS Hornet, now moored at Alameda, Calif. Harold served from 1964-1967, including Aviation Storekeeper Class A School in Millington, Tenn., Naval Station Rota Spain, Squadron HS-3 at NAS Norfolk and the USS Randolph CVS-15, S-6 Division, and advanced to AK2. I (Howard) joined in September 1965.

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Family of sailors

My father served in the U.S. Coast Guard during Prohibition. I served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1973, reaching the rank of AE2. My youngest daughter just separated from the U.S. Navy in December 2014. She served as a U.S. Navy Corpsman. Three generations have served, perhaps more to come in the future. We are all proud of our time served!

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Oliveira military veterans

My father immigrated from Portugal as a young man. I am the youngest of three sons. My oldest brother, who has passed, was in the Army for 27 years and served with the 25th Infantry Division in Korea, where he was wounded. He retired in the 70's.My second brother, also Army, served in Vietnam with the 1st Infantry as a combat engineer.I served proudly in Vietnam in 1967 with a maintenance battalion in the central. My mother had all her three sons in the u.s. Army at one time. My father was so thankful to be here and have his own business - made sure we were also dedicated to our country.

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Three generations serving this nation

Father - William Carl Reed, 2nd Lt., U.S. Army Anti-aircraft Artillery, World War II Son - Gregory Carl Reed, Sp5, U.S. Army Combat Medic, 1967-1971 Grandson - Brandon Jared Reed, SSG, U.S. Air Force Crew Chief, currently on active duty

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240 years of service

240 years of service

My Coolidge fifth-great-grandfather was at the Boston Tea Party and died at the Battle of Lexington. Another Coolidge fought in the French and Indian War. I had Coolidge and Cammack ancestors on both sides of the Civil War. My grandfather Coolidge fought in World War I, my father in the Navy in World War II, I was on a submarine and LST during the Vietnam War, and my nephew currently is in the Army. Victor Landry Post 159 Bryan, Texas

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Family legacy

As far as I know we had no family members in the first World War, but boy, we had a few in the second World War. My father (first-born from parents from Poland) and two of his brothers ... three more uncles from my mother's side. They all came back except my Uncle Joe, who was killed in the Pacific theater (Philippines, I believe). One uncle served in the Korean War. Myself and a brother served in Vietnam ... the stories I could tell ... whew ... would fill more than a few pages. Sgt. Larry Donaleski 6922nd, 4th Detachment, 13th Air Force

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Family service to country

My grandfather served in the Army in World War I. My father served in the Navy during World War II. He received the Purple Heart for shrapnel injuries he sustained when his ship was sunk during the invasion of the Philippines. I have two brothers, one who served in the Navy during the Vietnam conflict. He was stationed on an aircraft carrier that flew missions over Vietnam. My other brother served in the Army as a translator during the Vietnam conflict.

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Clifton M. Booth

Clifton M. Booth

I am a Vietnam veteran, and I would like to put in something for my uncle Clifton M. Booth. He was a World War II veteran in George Patton's Armored Division, 712 Tank Destroyer Battalion. I never learned about his military history until after he died back in 2011. I consider my uncle as one of the many great heroes of any war, that a soldier has to leave his family and go far away to fight for their country. All soldiers, no matter what branch of the service, should be looked at this way. No matter what others think.

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Three generations so far

Three generations so far

Having served in the Marine Corps from February 1959 to August 1968, I am proud to have my grandson (Iraq and Afganistan veteran) and my great-grandson (graduating MCRD on April 3, 2015) following in my tradition as United States Marines.

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Tomlinson family military history

My father, W.D. Tomlinson, served in the Air Force for 27 years as an officer, navigator and pilot. I served in the Air Force as an officer and pilot with three tours in Southeast Asia during Vietnam, and flew 118 combat missions. My cousin Danny Tomlinson served as an officer in the Navy during Vietnam. My brother Richard Tomlinson served in the Marines during Vietnam. My son Todd Tomlinson served in the Army Reserves and was activated during the L.A. riots. Both my sisters' husbands served, one in the Air Force and one in the Navy, during the Vietnam time frame.

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Family legacy

Family legacy

Grandfather served in World War I. Father served in World War II. I served in Vietnam. My youngest brother served in Saida War. Most notable: we all volunteered, as African-Americans. I am proud to have served as I am of my family.

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Swope/Malott family

My father was in the Army in the 1920s era. All my uncles (seven) served in World War II, i.e., Army, Marines, Navy, Army/Air Corps, from pvt. to two-star general (great uncle). One second cousin was on USS Arizona when it went down at Pearl Harbor. On to Korea, more were still serving for a career, i.e., my brother and I went in the service for a long career as well as three cousins. On to Vietnam, as we still have family members serving into the 1970s. The 80s, 90s and up above 2000.

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Simply stated: five brothers

Simply stated: five brothers

The legacy begins long before I was born. Brother No. 1, born 1925, went to war in the South Pacific for World War II, Navy, returned. Brother No. 2, born 1926, went to war in the South Pacific for World War II, Navy, returned. Brother No. 3, born 1929, Went to war in Korea (MIA), Navy pilot. His story was depicted in a book titled "Baited Trap" by Tracy D. Connors. Brother No.

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Yakoski family military service

Yakoski family military service

The original family name was YAKOWSKI, but my father dropped the "W" during his time in the Army. My branch of the family uses the shortened version of our last name. That being said, my father, Joseph Yakoski, served in the Army during World War II as a truck mechanic. He served in Germany and France during hostilities there. My uncle Henry Yakowski served in the Navy as a seaman. My uncle Francis Yakowski served in the Marines and was in Korea during its hostilities. I, Joseph Yakoski Jr., served in the Navy as an aircraft electrician, becoming an AE-1.

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Six Phillips brothers serve in World War ll, all return

Six Phillips brothers serve in World War ll, all return

This story is about the six Phillips brothers who all served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II at the same time. Six brothers serving at the same time during war is a remarkable thing - all of them surviving to return home is amazing. The Phillips family was from Syracuse, N.Y., and these men were my wife's uncles. I have attached a copy of a Syracuse newspaper story about them; I would guess that it would be dated later in the war years. I have seen various stories about multiple siblings being on active duty during times of war, but never six, and sadly all didn’t survive.

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Met in Army and married after four days

Charles and Bea Turner had been married over 50 years before their deaths, but only knew each other four days in the Army Air Corps. My dad flew in a B-24 over the Burma Hump during the war (India to China). My mother was a WAC during the war, and packed parachutes and refueled planes back in the States. At the end of the war they met in Detroit (ROMULAS AIR BASE) ready to be discharged. My dad was from PA and mom from MI, so instead of going their separate ways a justice of the peace married them and they lived in PA all their lives.

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