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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

Simply stated: five brothers

Simply stated: five brothers

The legacy begins long before I was born. Brother No. 1, born 1925, went to war in the South Pacific for World War II, Navy, returned. Brother No. 2, born 1926, went to war in the South Pacific for World War II, Navy, returned. Brother No. 3, born 1929, Went to war in Korea (MIA), Navy pilot. His story was depicted in a book titled "Baited Trap" by Tracy D. Connors. Brother No.

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Yakoski family military service

Yakoski family military service

The original family name was YAKOWSKI, but my father dropped the "W" during his time in the Army. My branch of the family uses the shortened version of our last name. That being said, my father, Joseph Yakoski, served in the Army during World War II as a truck mechanic. He served in Germany and France during hostilities there. My uncle Henry Yakowski served in the Navy as a seaman. My uncle Francis Yakowski served in the Marines and was in Korea during its hostilities. I, Joseph Yakoski Jr., served in the Navy as an aircraft electrician, becoming an AE-1.

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Six Phillips brothers serve in World War ll, all return

Six Phillips brothers serve in World War ll, all return

This story is about the six Phillips brothers who all served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II at the same time. Six brothers serving at the same time during war is a remarkable thing - all of them surviving to return home is amazing. The Phillips family was from Syracuse, N.Y., and these men were my wife's uncles. I have attached a copy of a Syracuse newspaper story about them; I would guess that it would be dated later in the war years. I have seen various stories about multiple siblings being on active duty during times of war, but never six, and sadly all didn’t survive.

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Met in Army and married after four days

Charles and Bea Turner had been married over 50 years before their deaths, but only knew each other four days in the Army Air Corps. My dad flew in a B-24 over the Burma Hump during the war (India to China). My mother was a WAC during the war, and packed parachutes and refueled planes back in the States. At the end of the war they met in Detroit (ROMULAS AIR BASE) ready to be discharged. My dad was from PA and mom from MI, so instead of going their separate ways a justice of the peace married them and they lived in PA all their lives.

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Family history

My father served in the U.S. Army for 27 years and retired as a W-4. I served six years and got out as an E-5. My oldest served four years in the Air Force and got out as an E-5. My grandson is still serving in the Air Force as an E-6 with 12 years' service, currently assigned in Afghanistan, should be returning in June. That's a total of 48 years. I'm proud of this. My Dad was Cliff H., I am Cliff Sr., my son is Cliff Jr., his son is Cliff III, his son is Cliff IV. Carrying on the family tradition.

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McLean brothers in World War II and Korea

The McLean brothers were from a small farm town in South Dakota called Gettysburg. There were six of them who served in World War II. Their names were Hugh, Charles, Robert, John, Roy and Donald. They all came home. Hugh had shell shock, and Donald lost an eye and part of his face, but at least they came home. Their younger brother Calvin served in Korea. Their mother Eda was a proud Gold Star Mother. They are all gone now, but certainly not forgotten. They were my uncles and I am so proud to say so. Connie Edris

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9 boys from one family, all in military

We lived in a farm community outside of Pittsburgh, and all nine boys from our family served in the military: Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines. Four served during World War II, and five were Korean War veterans. We have all served in The American Legion, although presently I am the only one still a member, of Post 273, Madiera Beach, Fla. I am the youngest of my brothers. My grandson has spent many tours of duty in Iraq and Afganistan as a helicopter pilot. We were always so proud to serve our country.

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From biplanes to jets

From biplanes to jets

My father, CM Sgt. Paul H. Niemeyer (retired), enjoyed many firsts in his long military career. He enlisted in 1943 and was stationed in Okinawa during World War II. He was the LAST enlisted pilot in the Army Air Corps, and flew as a crew chief for many years and was allowed to taxi jet fighters. He was last licensed to taxi the F-86D at Ethan Allen Air Force Base in Winooski, Vt. Dad was the first E-8 (SM Sgt.) made in the Air Force and the second E-9 (CM Sgt.) in the Air Force. Both Dad and a good friend of his had the same time in service and date of rank as M Sgts.

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Family history in the military

My maternal grandfather served during World War I. My father served in the Navy during World War II. My maternal uncle served in the Marines after World War II and was discharged, then joined the Army when the Korean War started and went to Korea. He was with the 2nd Infantry Division. He was in a battle and was captured. He was listed as missing in action until the end of hostilities, when he was accounted for from a list from a captured American doctor that stated that he was treated for malnutrition and pneumonia. He died while he was still a prisoner of war.

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Family military history

-John Davidson of Prince Edward County, Va., Virginia Line, American Revolution -Dr. Richard Davidson of Kentucky, U.S. Army, Fort Adams, Miss., 1804-1807, and surgeon at the Battle of New Orleans, War of 1812 -Louis M. Davidson of Mississippi, Pvt., Mexican War -Roland J. Davidson of New Orleans, U.S. Army Air Corps, World War II and Korean War -Kerry J. Davidson, U.S. Army, Vietnam War Various other collateral family members in all branches of service, from Revolution to present-day campaigns.

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Sherman history

I served in the Air Force August 1958 to November 1963. My oldest son, in the Army for 26 years. My next son had 12 years in the Army. My third son had 55 years in the Marine Corps.

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Generations

Generations

In my family we have had five generations in the Navy. My grandfather, Canadian Navy; my father, Canadian Navy; myself, U.S. Navy, my son, U.S. Navy; and my grandson, now serving in the U.S. Navy as a medical officer.

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Fred A. Hedlund returns from the Pacific in 1945

Chief Fred A. Hedlund returned to get married on July 14, 1945, to Miss Eleanor V. Anderson of Chicago.

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At 12, future Air Force master sergeant saves brother's life

At 12, future Air Force master sergeant saves brother's life

Harris and Mable Amundson had five sons; four of the brothers served in the U.S. Air Force: Gerald, Dorvin, Roger and Dennis. The fifth son, Kenneth, signed up but was rejected for a medical reason. Jerry saved my life when I was 7 and he was only 12. My brother, Gerald C. Amundson, was only two months from completing his senior year at the high school in Benson, Minn., in 1952 when he dropped out of school to join the Air Force.

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Right next door to the Arizona

I remember when I was a kid and my mom told me that my uncle Glenn (Reddick) was assigned to a ship that just happened to be moored right next to the USS Arizona on Dec. 7, 1941. At the time, when I was 9 years old, that really didn't matter much to me. Later on in life, and unfortunately after my uncle Glenn passed away, I realized what a significant part of history he and his shipmates would play. I never really got a good chance to talk with uncle Glenn, or my Marine uncle on my dad's side of the family.

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Couple's hobby leads to proper headstone for Civil War veteran

Civilians Richard and Joni Smith are a couple that share long family ties to the military and a fascination with genealogy. This has led them to the discovery of several things in common they wouldn't otherwise know about one another: they have ancestors who fought on opposite sides of the American Revolution. Richard's ancestor, Phillipp Heimrich Stuber, was a German mercenary, fighting for the Redcoats. Joni's, John Mudgett, was an American.

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My military family

My dad's uncle served in World War I, was gassed, died in the 1920s and was a member of The American Legion. My dad served in the Army in Europe in World War II and was a member of the Legion. My dad's two brothers both served in the Air Force, one in World War II, the other in Vietnam. I served in the Army Reserve for six year during the Vietnam era and am a member of the Legion.

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A family in service

My mother was the youngest of 10 siblings - she was born in 1919, to give you an idea of the time frame. The three oldest siblings served during the Great War (World War I): Frank Hall, U.S. Army ambulance driver, Austro Italian front; George Hall, a seaman, served with Naval Aviation; and Jeanette Hall, a yeomanette. Four of the younger siblings served during World War II and after: Dr. Charles H. Hall, medical officer, U.S. Army, North Africa and Italy; Dr. Reina Hall, U.S. Army nurse, North Africa and Italy; William Hall, U.S. Army Air Corps, U.S. Army Air Forces and U.S.

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Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, Merrill's Marauders

Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, Merrill's Marauders

My dad, Staff Sgt. Wesley F. Celius, was one of 2,997 combat veteran troops who volunteered for Merrill's Marauders. He was one of 130 who came out of the Burma jungles alive, but was not one who was not hospitalized. (Only two were not.) Dad never talked about his time spent there, except for the fact that he got malaria and dysentery and was hospitalized.

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Some serve who don't fight

My father was drafted in 1943 at 32. His civilian employment was as a certified public accountant. He was sent to air gunner's school at Greensboro, N.C. Before he was sent overseas he received orders to Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio. From there he was sent to Fort Sheridan in Chicago. For the next three years he was engaged in contract termination negotiations with Ford, GM, Chrysler and Boeing. By the start of 1944 the Army Air Forces had already contracted for more aircraft than were necessary. Three times he applied for command of an Air Sea Rescue PT Boat.

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