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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

Every branch!

In the limited amount of family history I have delved into, I have found family members in every branch of military service. Great-great-great-grandfather, Continental Army Great-uncle, Navy, Spanish-American War Great-uncle, Army cavalry officer, World War I Grandfather, Merchant Marines, World War I Father, Army Air Corps, World War II and Korea Mother, Coast Guard, World War II Two uncles, Army, World War II Uncle, Marine Corps, World War II Father-in-law, China marine and Marines, World War II Myself, Navy, 1965-1971 Son, Navy Grandson, Army

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Generations that served/some who gave all

Great-uncle: Frank Branigan, World War I, U.S. Army, killed in action in France. Second cousin: Roy Hydecker, World War II, U.S. Marine Corps GSGT, D-Day invasion force, killed in action in St. Lo, France. Cousin: Bill DeSetto, Vietnam War, U.S. Air Force communications, Vietnam and Cambodia. Uncle: Frank DeSetto, U.S. Navy, Korea. Cousin: Ernest DeSetto, U.S. Navy, late 1950s. Third cousin: Frank DeSetto, Vietnam, U.S. Marine Corps, shot in the eye and survived with glass eye. Me: James E. Branigan, Vietnam, U.S. Navy 1967-1971, aviation machinist mate, VR24 Naples and USS Wasp CV18.

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Long line of Army

I had heard stories of my grandfather in World War I. My father and his brothers served in World War II; one of them did not return. My uncle on my mother's side did three tours in Vietnam. My poor father had five daughters. I joined the Army in October 1974 and got out in February 1978. Durning my enlistment I was the first and only airborne female at Fort Lewis, Wash. I was the first military female to jump into Alaska and Panama. Three of my four children joined. In 2004 my twin daughters were in Iraq. They were both diesel mechanics.

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CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels Sr.

CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels Sr.

CW5 (ret.) James E. Revels served 37 years in the regular Army. His specialty was in logistics and he was stationed with various units from field artillery to military intelligence. He attended the U.S. Army School, Europe's school of logistics, where he made such good grades that he was invited back to be an instructor. With every unit he served with subsequently, he was responsible for all the ordering of supplies, of great value in some cases.

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The Farrow family

My name is John Farrow, and I am proud of my family and extended families' service to the USA. My dad's uncle, Allie Farrow, served in the Army as a recruit camp instructor just prior to our involvement in World War I. My dad, Alexander Farrow, served in France and Belgium during World War I in the Yankee Division, the 26th Inf. Div. He was a sergeant in the artillery. He led a small group of forward observers into no mans'land, where they relayed information regarding the effect of shell fire from their batteries.

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Lannings in the military

Lannings in the military

My father served in the U.S. Army from 1941 to 1945 time as a medic; his brother John served during the Korean War. My brother served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. I served in the U.S. Air Force during Vietnam, and was in country in 1967. My oldest son served in the U.S. Army and was in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. My second son served in the U.S. Army during Desert Storm and was stationed in Germany. One of my daughters served in The U.S. Air Force, stationed in Germany during Desert Storm, and I had one granddaughter serve in the U.S. Air Force.

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World War II gunner's story unites two families across the globe decades after death

World War II gunner's story unites two families across the globe decades after death

William "Vern" Williams' niece and nephews and Uwe Carstens kneel beside his grave in Winfred, S.D. From left to right: Gary Williams, Kay Julius, Uwe Carstens and Ken Williams When Uwe Carstens knelt in front of William "Vern" Williams' grave in Winfred, S.D., it was a trip that took him decades into the past, halfway around the world and brought him full circle.

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Why the military community gets upset with impostors

People ask why the military active, reserve, guard, veteran, retiree and their families get so upset with those who choose to buy a uniform, place a whole host of decorations and badges on it then prance around as if they actually accomplished what they are showing. The First Amendment allows these impostors the freedom to express themselves as they see fit. If they choose to express appreciation for the military by wearing the uniform of a particular service then they are free to do so.

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Family looks forward to future generation of service

Family looks forward to future generation of service

Photo | Shane James III, Philip Manning's great-grandson, poses in front of the American flag. As he expected, Philip Manning was drafted in 1954. His entrance into military service was somewhat typical. Somewhere along the line his name had been misspelled. "The whole time I was in the Army it was spelled with two Ls. Do you think I could ever get that corrected?" Manning joked. (It stuck.) He headed to Missouri for basic and then to Camp Gordon, Ga., for second basic training, which was in the Signal Corps.

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The forgotten soldier

My name is Robert D. Kowell. I'm a member of American Legion Post 1980 in Woodland Park, Colo. This story is about my dad, who was in the Army in World War I. He was blown up in an ammo truck in France, I believe. He survived the ordeal. He had been sprayed with shrapnel in his back and did not want to go to the medic for care, knowing he would be removed from his unit; so another soldier patched him up and went back to fighting.

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One soldier's service honored in Ohio in line with family's legacy

Joseph Schreiber returned to the United States near the end of World War I, having been sent to Germany as a child after the death of his parents. Though he missed his opportunity to serve, he would see several of his sons go on to fulfill their duty. Joe Schreiber served 32 years in the Navy, retiring as a master chief. Les Schreiber also joined the Navy, serving for 20 years before also retiring as a master chief, brother John Schreiber said. Their step-brother, Larry Steuber, died at Pearl Harbor. He wasn't yet 20 years old, John said.

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My dad, my brother and me

My father was in World War I. He was a chef trained at Fort Devens, Mass. He served in France. My brother served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He was an air traffic controller and served in Thule, Greenland, and at Mathis AFB in California. I was in the Coast Guard 1959-1963, stationed at Coast Air Station, Salem, Mass., and Coast Guard Air Detachment, Naples, Italy.

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Proud black American service

Proud black American service

Grandfather (Eddie P. Johnson) served in World War I. Father (James R. Johnson) served in the Korean War. I (James E. Johnson Sr.) served in the Vietnam War. My brother (Willie M. Johnson) served in the Persian/Saudi War. All were in country.

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Farrow family has long line of veterans, Legionnaires

My father, Alexander W. Farrow, went into the U.S. Army in 1915. He rose to the rank of sergeant. When the U.S. went to Europe to fight in World War I, dad went over as a member of the Yankee Division. He was an artillery sergeant and he led a squad into no-mans land in several of the many battles in France as forward observers directing artillery fire. He was given a citation for bringing back to the rear a wounded squad member.

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Four brothers serve in four branches

Four brothers serve in four branches

Photos: from left, James E. Brown; Harold W. Brown; Elmer E. Brown; and Donald J. Brown. My three brothers and I cover four branches of service: the Marines, Air Force, Navy and Army. But it didn't start with us. The Brown family has served our country a long time. Our great-grandfather John Williamson Brown served in the Army during the Civil War from 1863-1864. Our grandfather Isaac Williamson Brown served in the 3rd Infantry Division during the Spanish American War from 1898-1901. Our father, Elmer Elsworth Brown, enlisted in the Army during World War I.

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Tennessee man recalls three generations of family service

George Fain's friend Bobby Adams returned home from the Marines decked out with gear and a sharp, crisp green uniform. Fain took that sight in and discovered a new direction. "And that sold me on the Marine Corps," Fain said. He served in the Pacific as a Marine throughout the islands surrounding Pearl Harbor. He tried to sign up once, but too young (and too small to pass as older) he was told to wait. He did, until he was 17, at which point he got his father Van L.

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A Veterans Day tribute to duty, honor and sacrifice

A Veterans Day tribute to duty, honor and sacrifice

It’s been more than 13 years since the passing of my dad, John “Jack” Gothreau, who died in October 2001. In tribute to his memory and to all those who served in our nation’s conflicts I thought it worthwhile to share the experience of my dad’s family in World War II. Five of 10 children would heed the call to service. Dad, as well as his brothers Chris and Eugene, went to the Pacific theater, while brother James was sent to France, and sister Marge served as a naval nurse stationed at the Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, N.H.

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Three generations of military service.

My father enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in September 1948. During his career, he served in munitions and then spent 18 years in EOD. He retired as a SMSgt on Sept. 1, 1969. My father served in Okinawa during the Korean War, later in Texas, Maine, England, South Carolina, Canada and New Mexico. On Sept. 2, 1969, I enlisted in the Army and served as an instructor in the Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, N.J. In the spring of 1995 my son enlisted in the Arkansas Army National Guard in a Signal Unit. He did his AIT at Signal School at Fort Gordon, Ga., in 1996.

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Family names!

Family names!

Navy Lt. George Wells, Father! Army Maj. Paul Bratton, Uncle! ANG PFC Billy Rose, Cousin! Marine LCPL Darrell Wells, Cousin! ANG Col. Jackie Rose, Cousin! FLIGHT OFF RAF Andy Duncan, Stepfather! USAF Capt./TSgt. Andrew K. Duncan, Self!

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Kelly family service

My father was in the U.S. Army from 1948-1952, boot camp at Fort Dix, N.J., served as Army of Occupation Japan and the Korean War (three combat tours), and was attached to the 1st Calvary-27th Ordinance Group.

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