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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

One family offers 10 sons to country

One family offers 10 sons to country

In the Ostler family, 10 men, including me, served their country during World War II and Korea. We were all born and lived in Chelsea, Mass., and were drafted. My mother, a practicing Catholic, had 12 children: 11 boys, one girl. Eight of my brothers — Charles, Howard, Arthur, George, Donald, Robert, Roland and Leo — were drafted into the Army. My brother Howard was placed in the Air Corps. All served with honor and distinction in combat and received decorations.

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George A. Blood, Civil War veteran

George A. Blood, Civil War veteran

Cpl. George A. Blood was born in Sturbridge, Mass., on April 11, 1843. He served three years with the Union Army, from July 21, 1862 to July 31, 1865. He was part of the Co. A, 34th Massachusetts Inf. Veteran Reserve Corp Volunteers. On Sept. 21-22, under the command of Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan, Union soldiers engaged the Confederate Army at Fisher Hill in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. On the 22nd Blood was wounded while charging the enemy. The wound left him with one arm crippled. He was discharged from Douglas Hospital in Washington, D.C., on July 31, 1865.

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Our story

My father, Raymond B. Kelsey, was drafted into the Army during the last year of World War I. Upon his graduation from college he accepted a commission in the Army Reserves, was activated in 1941 and served in the United States and Europe. He was again called to active duty during the Korean War. I served in the Navy during Korea and in the Air Force during Vietnam. Both of us are/were life members of Post 22 in Manning, Iowa, with well over 100 years of Legion membership. My grandson Jonathan Kelsey is now serving in the Coast Guard. Lt. Col. Donn R.

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Family tradition

Well, my legacy of service started with Cpl. Henry Snively in the Pennsylvania Militia during the Revolutionary War, serving at the Battle of Brandywine and Trenton. I have two descendants who fought in the Civil War and were killed at Sharpsburg. The warriors are my lineage on my mother's side of the family. My father served at the end of World War II and the Korean War. His brother also served in World War II. My brother served in the Vietnam War era as a Marine. I myself served 22 years of combined service in the Marines and the California Army Guard as a Grunt.

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Four brothers who served their country with pride

Four brothers who served their country with pride

Four brothers served our country, each representing a different branch of the military. Raymond E. Craig (93) was a private in the Army during World War II, serving in Africa and Italy with the 34th Infantry Division that experienced over 500 days of combat. Ronald H. Craig (deceased) served with the U.S. Air Corps in England during World War II and made the Air Force his chosen career. Howard B. Craig (deceased) served in the Pacific during World War II on USS Medusa.

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My family and its military heritage

My father was not able to join his neighbors in the second great war due to his asthma condition. However, he built bridges and bombs as he was a welder for a company in Youngstown, Ohio. His brother, my Uncle Bob, served in Korea, and my brother Ken served in the Navy during the Vietnam conflict. I joined the U.S. Air Force because I wanted to keep a tradition alive and serve my country. I was the first of my family who served in the USAF.

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Family Ties

The youngest in my father's family served in the Navy and I remember asking my uncle how he liked it. He said he was proud of his service but felt cheated because he did not see combat like my father. At the tender age of 9 or 10 I took that as saying combat must really be cool! He told me to ask my dad about it and see if it was as cool as i thought it was. Some years later I did ask my father about his combat experiences. He never really spoke about them and when I asked him about them, all he would say was that it was ugly.

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Charles Marshall family

I am Charles R. Marshall, a biographer, who served in the Alaskan Air Command in the Korean War. My support group was assigned to Ladd Air Force Base, Fairbanks, Alaska. I am a current 30-year consecutive member of The American Legion Post 61, Sacramento, Ca. Our families have made their sacrifices, our warriors have answered the call to duty. Here are their bios: Albert H. Marshall, my father. A combat infantryman, served in the 3rd Infantry in Europe in World War I. He was awarded three campaign stars -- the Battle of the Marne and St.

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Married couple served in Second World War, at home and abroad

Married couple served in Second World War, at home and abroad

My parents are both World War II veterans. They married a few months before my father entered active duty in 1942. My father, Roy Carletti, is 92 years old. He served in the Army and landed on the beaches at Normandy. He received several medals for that service, which also included campaigns in Northern France, Rhineland, and Central Europe. My mom, Vera Carletti, served in the US Navy from 1944-1946. She worked at the Pentagon and in manufacturing as part of her service. She passed away in April of this year. She was 88 years old.

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Lovelady Gap

My ancestor, Thomas Lovelady, was an enlisted man in both the North Carolina and South Carolina militias during the Revolutionary War, at Guilford Courthouse and the Battle of the Cowpens. His rank was that of a corporal, and in company with eleven militiamen who were returning from Cross Creek, near New Bern where they had been sent to rout some Tories. Being very tired and hungry, they stopped on Stinking Creek at the home of an old Dutchman named Adam Appel and asked for food and lodging.

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Esphorst Family Military History

My great-great-grandfather, Caspar Esphorst, served in the Enrolled Missouri Militia for the Union Army in the Civil War. My grandfather, George H. Esphorst, served with the 35th Division, 1st Infantry, Company D of the U.S. Army during World War I and participated in the Argonne Forest battle. My father, George W. Esphorst, served in the 2nd Marine Division during World War II and was wounded during the landing on Saipan. My older brother, Eric G.

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Sounding taps for a World War II Marine vet

My father, Ralph Eugene Riley, was a decorated Marine who was wounded in action on Sept. 15, 1944, at the Battle of Peleliu (which took place on what is now Palau). This would be what the National Museum of the Marine Corps calls "the bitterest battle" of World War II: Japanese gunners inflicted more than 1,100 casualties on the First Marine Division on the day my father was wounded. Besides Peleliu, my father served within the enemy zone of operations in the Pacific Theater from 1942-1944, including campaigns at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and Cape Gloucester.

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My Wife's Great Uncle

His name is John R. Glod. He was born Jan. 3, 1944, and served in Vietnam where he was injured and lost his full eye, but still has one left from the grace of God. I don't know if he recieved a Purple Heart or not. I would like to know if, with your experience, you can find out what his family can do to request a Purple Heart. We love him dearly and would like to see him honored for his sacrifice from our Great Military. Thank You, Norman Kline

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The Lamchick Family

My father, Howard E. Proper Lamchick served in the Army of Occupation during World War II. He was a medical corpsman. A strong family man, he worked hard as a blue collar worker both at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard in Brooklyn, New York and the U.S. Submarine Base in Groton, Ct. His field of expertise was plumbing. A powerful American Citizen and U. S.

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Why I Served

Why I Served

Growing up as most boys do playing army and raising cane throughout the neighborhood. The military was always visable as all branches had members at one time or the other. one item always caught my eye in my uncles house, only 8X12 bronze in color with a tank in shadow above a map of Europe. As I got older I started questioning what it was no one would answer till I was about 15 when my aunt sat down with me one day and explained what it was.

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The Henderson / McKnitt Family Military Service

My sister appointed me family historian, on Marco Island, FL in 1999. She said, “You have to do something besides hang out as a beach bum and chase ladies.” Now in 2013 I can relate a portion of my family tree and their military service.

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Plaisted Family Service

Plaisted Family Service

The Plaisted family has had a family member in every war ,since Roger Plaisted whom was killed by indians in Maine, to my service during Desert Storm. My grandfather Lawrence Bechard WW2 served in Army, Rhineland, Ardennes, an Central Europe. My father Delbert Plaisted who served in WW2 on a Liberty Ship, Atlantic war zone, Pacific war zone, Philippine Liberation (with stars). He also served during the Korean war in the Army. My brother Charlie Plaisted served during the Vietnam war in the Navy. Raymond Bechard whom was killed in Vietnam.

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Thank God for the Military

Thank God for the Military

My Grandfather fought in France in WW1 My Father was an Army POW ,captured in the Battle of the Bulge. While being a POW in 4 different camps,he escaped twice,and was re-captured.After being bruttaly beaten ,he was sent to Dachau where he was finally liberated. I myself was in the Marines,stationed in Viet-Nam,68-69. Today my Daughter is carrying on our family military tradition in the Army Reserve

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Three Generations of Legionnaires

Three Generations of Legionnaires

I've followed my family legacy in being a Legionnaire. My grandfather, Boyd W. Stone, Sr. was a veteran of WW I (2nd Div.) and WW II (2nd Military Railway Service in the ETO) and was Commander of Terminal Railroad Post 85 in St. Louis, Mo in 1938. My Dad, Boyd W. Stone, Jr (5th Army Airforce, Pacific) was a veteran of WW II and Korea and held many offices with Thoman Boothe Post 338 in Overland, MO. I, Donald R. Stone, served during the Vietnam era and am a Past Commander of New Berlin, WI Post 488, and Historian for District 1 of the Wisconsin American Legion Riders.

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Family Tradition - Serving in the United States Navy

Family Tradition - Serving in the United States Navy

My Dad, Ross Charles Tench married my Mom (Margaret) in 1938 and had a beautiful baby girl on their anniversary in 1939. Another baby girl followed and then a boy. World War II had started and Dad first worked for the government at a Blimp Base in Elizabeth City, NC followed by a stint at the Naval Yards in Brunswick. Ga. By the time 1943 rolled around Dad enlisted in the US Navy and served onboard the USS Providence CLG-6 until the war ended in 1945. Four more kids would follow, another girl and three more boys.

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