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Family Legacy

Share your family's story of military service with us. Visit Legiontown U.S.A. to share your story.

Married couple served in Second World War, at home and abroad

Married couple served in Second World War, at home and abroad

My parents are both World War II veterans. They married a few months before my father entered active duty in 1942. My father, Roy Carletti, is 92 years old. He served in the Army and landed on the beaches at Normandy. He received several medals for that service, which also included campaigns in Northern France, Rhineland, and Central Europe. My mom, Vera Carletti, served in the US Navy from 1944-1946. She worked at the Pentagon and in manufacturing as part of her service. She passed away in April of this year. She was 88 years old.

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Lovelady Gap

My ancestor, Thomas Lovelady, was an enlisted man in both the North Carolina and South Carolina militias during the Revolutionary War, at Guilford Courthouse and the Battle of the Cowpens. His rank was that of a corporal, and in company with eleven militiamen who were returning from Cross Creek, near New Bern where they had been sent to rout some Tories. Being very tired and hungry, they stopped on Stinking Creek at the home of an old Dutchman named Adam Appel and asked for food and lodging.

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Esphorst Family Military History

My great-great-grandfather, Caspar Esphorst, served in the Enrolled Missouri Militia for the Union Army in the Civil War. My grandfather, George H. Esphorst, served with the 35th Division, 1st Infantry, Company D of the U.S. Army during World War I and participated in the Argonne Forest battle. My father, George W. Esphorst, served in the 2nd Marine Division during World War II and was wounded during the landing on Saipan. My older brother, Eric G.

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Sounding taps for a World War II Marine vet

My father, Ralph Eugene Riley, was a decorated Marine who was wounded in action on Sept. 15, 1944, at the Battle of Peleliu (which took place on what is now Palau). This would be what the National Museum of the Marine Corps calls "the bitterest battle" of World War II: Japanese gunners inflicted more than 1,100 casualties on the First Marine Division on the day my father was wounded. Besides Peleliu, my father served within the enemy zone of operations in the Pacific Theater from 1942-1944, including campaigns at Guadalcanal, New Guinea and Cape Gloucester.

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My Wife's Great Uncle

His name is John R. Glod. He was born Jan. 3, 1944, and served in Vietnam where he was injured and lost his full eye, but still has one left from the grace of God. I don't know if he recieved a Purple Heart or not. I would like to know if, with your experience, you can find out what his family can do to request a Purple Heart. We love him dearly and would like to see him honored for his sacrifice from our Great Military. Thank You, Norman Kline

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The Lamchick Family

My father, Howard E. Proper Lamchick served in the Army of Occupation during World War II. He was a medical corpsman. A strong family man, he worked hard as a blue collar worker both at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard in Brooklyn, New York and the U.S. Submarine Base in Groton, Ct. His field of expertise was plumbing. A powerful American Citizen and U. S.

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Why I Served

Why I Served

Growing up as most boys do playing army and raising cane throughout the neighborhood. The military was always visable as all branches had members at one time or the other. one item always caught my eye in my uncles house, only 8X12 bronze in color with a tank in shadow above a map of Europe. As I got older I started questioning what it was no one would answer till I was about 15 when my aunt sat down with me one day and explained what it was.

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The Henderson / McKnitt Family Military Service

My sister appointed me family historian, on Marco Island, FL in 1999. She said, “You have to do something besides hang out as a beach bum and chase ladies.” Now in 2013 I can relate a portion of my family tree and their military service.

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Plaisted Family Service

Plaisted Family Service

The Plaisted family has had a family member in every war ,since Roger Plaisted whom was killed by indians in Maine, to my service during Desert Storm. My grandfather Lawrence Bechard WW2 served in Army, Rhineland, Ardennes, an Central Europe. My father Delbert Plaisted who served in WW2 on a Liberty Ship, Atlantic war zone, Pacific war zone, Philippine Liberation (with stars). He also served during the Korean war in the Army. My brother Charlie Plaisted served during the Vietnam war in the Navy. Raymond Bechard whom was killed in Vietnam.

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Thank God for the Military

Thank God for the Military

My Grandfather fought in France in WW1 My Father was an Army POW ,captured in the Battle of the Bulge. While being a POW in 4 different camps,he escaped twice,and was re-captured.After being bruttaly beaten ,he was sent to Dachau where he was finally liberated. I myself was in the Marines,stationed in Viet-Nam,68-69. Today my Daughter is carrying on our family military tradition in the Army Reserve

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Three Generations of Legionnaires

Three Generations of Legionnaires

I've followed my family legacy in being a Legionnaire. My grandfather, Boyd W. Stone, Sr. was a veteran of WW I (2nd Div.) and WW II (2nd Military Railway Service in the ETO) and was Commander of Terminal Railroad Post 85 in St. Louis, Mo in 1938. My Dad, Boyd W. Stone, Jr (5th Army Airforce, Pacific) was a veteran of WW II and Korea and held many offices with Thoman Boothe Post 338 in Overland, MO. I, Donald R. Stone, served during the Vietnam era and am a Past Commander of New Berlin, WI Post 488, and Historian for District 1 of the Wisconsin American Legion Riders.

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Family Tradition - Serving in the United States Navy

Family Tradition - Serving in the United States Navy

My Dad, Ross Charles Tench married my Mom (Margaret) in 1938 and had a beautiful baby girl on their anniversary in 1939. Another baby girl followed and then a boy. World War II had started and Dad first worked for the government at a Blimp Base in Elizabeth City, NC followed by a stint at the Naval Yards in Brunswick. Ga. By the time 1943 rolled around Dad enlisted in the US Navy and served onboard the USS Providence CLG-6 until the war ended in 1945. Four more kids would follow, another girl and three more boys.

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Humble offspring, Military family since 1750 in the USA

Humble offspring, Military family since 1750 in the USA

The rich heritage shared by the Isenberg family members, who are humble offspring of generations of Patriots, includes being direct descendants of “Sir Robert the Bruse”, the last King of Scotland and having relatives who traveled to America on the Mayflower. “Our family has a tradition of military service, said LTC (RET) Robert W. Isenberg. “Family members have served in every war since the French and Indian War in the 1750s to present day”. From the Bruce line we have 15 Revolution War ancestors. Our dad, LTC (RET) George W.

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Rubio Family

Rubio Family

Dear American Legion, My name is Joe Rubio and I’m writing in response to your notice in April’s magazine reference shared feelings of people who have proudly served in the U.S. Military. I’m writing about my family; The Rubio’s from San Bernardino, California. I’m only sorry that I didn’t do this year’s ago when our mother and father were still with us. The attached photo is sent only to show how some of us continued to “serve,” after the hitches. Our mom and dad had 14 kids; two girls and 12 boys. Of the 12 boys, “NINE” served in the U.S. Military.

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Beavers family

Beavers family

I am a proud member of Post 107 in Soddy-Daisy, Tenn. I wake up thankful every day for the generations before me who served this country and kept us safe. My grandfather, Richard Paige, served in the Navy during the Korean War and has been a member of The American Legion ever since. My younger brother, Scott, is a Sergeant (11B) in the Army currently on his second deployment to Afghanistan with the 173rd Infantry. Scott exemplifies what it means to be from the Volunteer State, and is a member of Post 107 too.

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Kallgren family

Kallgren family

I am a 59-year member of The American Legion. My dad was a World War I wounded veteran, and very proud to be a Legionnaire. He was a past commander of Connor-Trafton Post 119 in Guilford, Maine, as well as a a 20-year service officer, 17-year officer of the day for Memorial Day, and a past state sergeant-at-arms. I started my own Legion history as a member of the Sons, and as a bugler with a bugle-and-drum corps at 11. We were state champions in 1940, by default – we were the only corps to march on a rainy and muddy field. I joined the Legion in 1951, along with my two brothers.

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Brochetti family

Brochetti family

John Brochetti came back from his service in the 1940s to help establish Cosgrove Post 523 in Rural Valley, Pa. John – or “Spy,” as most know him – worked in the mines, yet always found time for the post. He started the baseball program and received all the equipment on credit – unheard of at the time. Each year, Spy would lead the Memorial Day parade from the Legion post to St. Mary’s Cemetery, where he helped the local schoolchildren put flags on all the veterans’ graves. Last September, he and his wife, Liz, helped dedicate the Shannock Valley War Memorial.

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Goodwin/Highley family

Goodwin/Highley family

We are a multigenerational military family with many years spent serving veterans through The American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary. My grandfather, C.E. Harkness, was too young to fight in World War I, and lied about his age to serve our country and was sent to France. My dad, Charles F. Goodwin, who has been instrumental in keeping Heinline-Hanks Post 38 active, has 61 years of continuous membership since he served World War II. While growing up, my sister and I sold poppies and helped with bake sales to benefit veterans homes.

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Budahazy/Stoddard family

Budahazy/Stoddard family

My family is very active at Frank P. Dorris Post 145 in Douglasville, Ga. My father, Robert Budahazy, is a retired Vietnam Air Force veteran. He is senior vice commander of the post, and our main bingo caller. My brother, John, is retired Navy, a Legionnaire and a member of the Legion Riders. I myself am an Army veteran, executive-board officer and Saturday-night bingo caller. My son, Joshua, is an Iraq Marine Corps veteran and active at the post. My mother, Verna, has been active in the Auxiliary for many years and has served in various positions.

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