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My Time in Uniform

My time in the Marine Corps as a recruit becoming a Marine

The drill instructors made a big impression on me. The DIs wanted to find the weak links in the platoon and build those recruits also into Marines. But almost immediately, my platoon was following every order the DIs gave us. And no one really cared about the unusual names the DIs called us. When the DIs had us running several miles, the platoon always did its duties together. Sometimes the DIs could scare the hell out of me and the rest of the platoon in what we needed to know about warfare. The movies are one thing; after working on a set everyone goes home.

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World War II vet receives recognition from French 70 years after service

World War II vet receives recognition from French 70 years after service

Frank Magrino had tried to enlist - his eyesight was too poor. But by 1943, the Army was calling his number in spite of its previous rejection. "They finally got down to where they needed me," Magrino said. He was 19 years old. He landed on Utah Beach in August 1944, and he was put in a replacement depot near St. Lo, France, he said. Afterward, he was transferred to England, then to Brussels, doing administrative work. He requested to return to active duty, and joined the 8th Infantry Division, 12th Engineer Battalion on Jan. 1, 1945, in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany, he said.

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A sentimental journey back to the 1940s

A sentimental journey back to the 1940s

By Joyce Whitis Post 240 Honorary Life Member Brad Thompson, as a young man from Stephenville, Texas, was spending his last days in the U.S. Army Air Corps packing up to ship home, when over the Armed Forces Network Radio came the strains of a new tune he had never heard before, " .... Gonna take a sentimental journey, gonna set my heart at ease, gonna take a sentimental journey to renew old memories ...." "What a way to end it all," he thought. "We had whipped the enemy and after two-and-a half years overseas, it was time for me to go home. What a time it was, those war years.

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World War II vet remembers growing up with the Legion

World War II vet remembers growing up with the Legion

George H. Breuler joined The American Legion almost immediately upon discharge following World War II. He served at Utah Beach, in Vienna, Austria and Czechoslovakia, he said. Breuler returned home from war just in time for Christmas in 1945. His timing was impeccable. He met his wife, Evelyn, at a hockey game on New Year's. "She was with this other fella, and I said, 'I'll call you.' That's how it all started," Breuler said. They were married in June 1946. That same year, he joined the Legion. He had been brought up in the organization. His father, George B.

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After 70 years, World War II's women vets get their due in Revere, Mass.

Legionnaire Eileen Merullo was reading the names of the deceased at a Post 61 memorial service when it hit her: There were no women on the list. "I was thinking to myself, there's no recognition for women at all in Revere, Mass. None. There is no signpost, nothing to honor the women, and so many women did go from Revere," she said. As a World War II veteran herself, Merullo started her project then: a monument honoring the women who served during WWII. She got the go ahead from the commander, then walked over to city hall to discuss the project with the mayor.

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Thanksgiving Day 1969 in Vietnam

Thanksgiving Day 1969 in Vietnam

“Death on call” was the motto of the Wolfpack gunship platoon of the 281st Assault Helicopter Company. The company arrived in Vietnam in June 1966 and departed in December 1970. In the fall of 1969, the North Vietnamese army held a large-scale operation northwest of Ban Me Thuot in central Vietnam. So pervasive was the operation that no U.S. army helicopters were allowed to fly in the area. That included medivac and supply missions. The only U.S. helicopters permitted to operate were gunships. It was all “top secret.” Capt.

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B-24 navigator's account of the 30-Seconds Mission in CBI

B-24 navigator's account of the 30-Seconds Mission in CBI

My brother Joseth Leland Kingsbury was in the European theater under Gen. Patton at the Battle of the Bulge. My brother Thomas Lloyd Kingsbury was in the Pacific from Australia to Manila, Philippines. I was in the China-Burma-India theater and Okinawa as a navigator on B-24 aircraft. My wife, Yvonne, was working in a Federal Reserve bank in 1941. We were visiting some friends one night when she received a phone call from the bank and was told to come in immediately. She worked all night with the FBI, teletyping Japanese names, not knowing what was going on until a few days later.

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Veteran vindicated in tale of sunken sub just before Pearl Harbor attack

Veteran vindicated in tale of sunken sub just before Pearl Harbor attack

Will Lehner entered the Naval Reserves at age 17 in 1938. He was called to active service in 1940 and put on a World War I destroyer, the USS Ward. The ship "had been in mothballs" for years, Lehner said, so the crew worked to put it back in commission. Afterward, Lehner served in the boiler room and then as a third-class cook. The Ward set sail for Pearl Harbor, where it patrolled the entrance. There were four "WWI-old" destroyers that would alternate weeks of service. Saturday, Dec. 6, the Ward went out on patrol. Skipper W.W.

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Freedom is - for those willing to defend it

The draft notice said, "Report to Ft Douglas, Utah for induction into the US Army on Sept 9, 1953." The day before, I enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. I completed basic training at Lackland AFB, Texas, and then joined Aviation Cadet Class 55-I for pilot training. My service is best described by the word "waiting." Waiting in the alert shack with my parachute and helmet in the cockpit of an F-89 or F-102 to launch when the buzzer sounded to defend against an attack coming across Canada.

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World War II wounded warrior

World War II wounded warrior

I'm a wounded warrior from World War II who landed on Utah Beach during the D-Day invasion at Normandy, France. I commanded a platoon of tanks at the young age of 19. We fought all the way to the Elbe River in Germany, including the Battle of the Bulge. We defeated Germany's Nazism because we were allowed to fight the enemy without the political rules of engagement. I was wounded near the Elbe and flown to a hospital in Nancy, France, two weeks before the war ended. Subsequently I was treated in three VA hospitals in California.

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Live and learn: how the Marine Corps changed my life

After receiving a meritorious promotion out of boot camp at Parris Island, S.C., I was ready and excited to start my tour of duty as a young motivated Marine. Little did I know that there was a secret being concealed that was so damaging, that had I known I would have never reported to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., as my orders had commanded. But, unaware of the deadly secret, I reported in March 1983, where I worked, played and stayed until September 1985, when orders sent me to Okinawa, Japan, where I stayed for approximately 12 months.

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Oct. 13-Oct. 12, 1953-1957

U.S. Navy, Korea - two trips to the war zone picking up troops. Eighteen months in Virginia ships company in the brig there.

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Shemya AFS, Alaska, 6984 Security Squadron, 1964-1965

I enlisted in Omaha, Neb., on Jan. 27, 1963. I walked two miles in heavy snow to a city bus stop. I flew to San Antonio, leaving 25-degree temperatures for 70 degrees. I started my basic training at Lackland and after 45 days was shipped by bus to Kessler in Biloxi, Miss. I graduated in July and was then stationed at Kelly AFB for one year. I finished my E-IO training by June 1964. While at Kelly I watched Air Force 21 take off for Dallas for the last time. The base was put on alert after JFK was assassinated. I was sent to Elmindorf AFB in Alaska, then posted TDY to the Aleutians.

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My dad

My dad

Taken from the actual award document (July 3, 1967) JOHN A. VARGAS SP4 E4 US51582456 Awarded: THE DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS FOR VALOR IN AERIAL FLIGHT For heroism while participating in aerial flight, Specialist Four John A. Vargas distinguished himself by heroic action on 19 May 1967, in the Republic of Vietnam. SPCIALIST VARGAS was serving as a door gunner on the lead aircraft of two armed helicopters performing a screening mission for a ground force in the HO BO Woods. while on a low level reconnaissance, the lead gunship came under intense ground fire and sustained multiple hits.

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A Long Way From Home: Memories from Iraq and Afghanistan

A Long Way From Home: Memories from Iraq and Afghanistan

A Long Way From Home by SFC (R) Christian Warren Freed Published by CaryPress CaryPress announces the latest highly anticipated military memoir from Raleigh, NC, author Christian Warren Freed. Raleigh, NC, September 24, 2014 War is Hell. Anyone who has ever put on a uniform and purposefully went to where the enemy was intent on killing him can attest to that. But instead of a singular definition of Hell that religion preaches, war is so much more. It is Hell on the families left behind. Hell on the mind and spirit. Hell on the nerves.

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Battle of the Bulge veteran reveals his closest call, family coincidence

Battle of the Bulge veteran reveals his closest call, family coincidence

[Photo: Joe Landry, a veteran of the Battle of the Bulge, takes a photo at the Fort Jackson military museum during a recent tour.] When Joe Landry was drafted, he asked to be "boosted up" so he could go into the Army with two of his friends. They ended up not going. In March 1944, Landry, an 18-year-old mechanic, landed in Scotland. He became a heavy truck driver for anti-aircraft artillery.

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E4 T.A. Donovan, U.S. Air Force, August 1960-August 1964

E4 T.A. Donovan, U.S. Air Force, August 1960-August 1964

Basic Training at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Texas Overview: Technical School at Keesler AFB, Biloxi, Miss. Spring 1961: Assigned to Yokota AFB, Fusa Machi Ken, Honshu, Japan AFSC 27230 and 27250; Air Traffic Controller, VFR Tower Operator Secondary AFSC as Certified Weather Observer Spring 1963: Assigned Altus AFB, Altus, Okla. AFSC 27250; Air Traffic Controller, VFR Tower Operator Secondary AFSC as Certified Weather Observer November 1963: Humanitarian reassignment to K.I.

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Korean War vet connects with Medal of Honor recipient

Korean War vet connects with Medal of Honor recipient

Pictured: Hugh McPhail, Carol McPhail and John William Finn Hugh McPhail graduated from high school in May 1950, and the next month the Korean War broke out. McPhail had enlisted in the National Guard a few years prior - an uncle gave consent. So, McPhail served with the Army from 1950-1952. By 20, he was a Special Forces Group tank commander in Korea, he said. He is a graduate of the Command General Staff Officers School at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, and of OCS in California. He then went on to more officer training at Ft. Knox, Ky.

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World War II 113th Cavalry veteran recalls fighting to the end

I'm 90 years old, and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. My father was a large operator in the sawmilling and timber industry across northern Virginia. I graduated from high school in Fairfax, Va., in 1941, and worked with him handling heavy oak lumber the following year. This work made me bull-strong and solid as a rock. Then came my papers from Uncle Sam: "I want you!" I was drafted and sent to Camp (now Ft.) Hood, Texas. There, I joined the 113th Cavalry. We trained in recon, strategy and tactics.

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World War II Sanitation Corps veteran takes Patriot Flight

World War II Sanitation Corps veteran takes Patriot Flight

At 96 years old, Sherwood Davies has a sharp memory and has seen a lot: Europe during World War II and the tuberculosis sanitarium in the Adirondacks and Dwight Eisenhower. He remembers exactly where he was when King George VI declared war on Germany - a speech now famous in a film with Colin Firth. Even so, the Patriot Flight he took to Washington, D.C., in June ranks as a memory to cherish.

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