Submitted by: Don Himelstein

Category: Books

THE RETURN OF RUNNNG HORSE
AND OTHER STORIES

From the occupation life of an American medical battalion stationed in Germany just prior to the war in Vietnam, until the day the young men are put on alert and sent off to Thailand where they soon find themselves in a very different land, these young soldiers will experience a world of war, kindness, and a whole way of life completely alien to them.
How they adjust and what they experience will remain with them for the rest of their lives. So begins the novelette THE RETURN OF RUNNING HORSE.
Nine short stories - including a Bronx mob street murder in "Jimmy the Candy Man," a warm tender romance of two young people meeting by chance at a small out-of-the-way Italian restaurant, and the heartfelt joy of a man fighting to see his kids at Christmastime - make up some of the author’s warm, moving stories that bring a tear to the eye and a warm feeling to the heart.

About the author:

Biography Don Himelstein’s first novel was published while he was still working as a Social Security analyst for the New York State Bureau of Disability. His short stories have been published in the Holiday Tales Anthology, the Adelaide Literary Magazine, the Apeiron Review and other publications. He served in the U.S. Army from 1962 to 1964 as a medical corpsman stationed in Europe and was involved in transporting military personnel arriving by plane, many on stretchers at Ramstein Air Force Base, to the Second General Hospital in Landstuhl, Germany. Having been ordered not to talk with the patients, he and the other ambulance drivers in his unit always wondered where all these wounded had come from since the only place Americans were at war was in Southeast Asia. His novel, OUR VINES HAVE BORNE NO FRUIT, was published by W&B Publishers and is currently available on Amazon and at Barnes & Noble bookstores. He recently had two more novels published by W&B, titled BEYOND THE WALK and THE PLAQUE: this is our country, too. After his discharge he went to school on the Vietnam-era veteran’s bill that allowed him to finish his BA at the College of Staten Island.